january 26, 2020

posted in: art, photography | 0

“Bravest Face” ~ Neil Peart, Alex Lifeson, Geddy Lee Weinrib
Though we might have precious little
It’s still precious
I like that song about this wonderful world
It’s got a sunny point of view
And sometimes I feel it’s true
At least for a few of us
I like that world; it makes a wonderful song
But there’s a darker point of view
But sadly just as true
For so many among us
Though we might have precious little
It’s still precious
In the sweetest child there’s a vicious streak
In the strongest man there’s a child so weak
In the whole wide world there’s no magic place
So you might as well rise, put on your bravest face
Put on your bravest face
I like that show where they solve all the murders
An heroic point of view
It’s got justice and vengeance too
At least so the story goes
I like that story; makes a satisfying case
But there’s a messy point of view
That’s sadly just as true
For so many among us
For so many among us
In the softest voice there’s an acid tongue
In the oldest eyes there’s a soul so young
In the shakiest will there’s a core of steel
On the smoothest ride there’s a squeaky wheel
In the sweetest child there’s a vicious streak
In the strongest man there’s a child so weak
In the whole wide world there’s no magic place
So you might as well rise, put on your bravest face
Put on your bravest face
In the softest voice there’s an acid tongue
In the oldest eyes there’s a soul so young
In the shakiest will there’s a core of steel
On the smoothest ride there’s a squeaky wheel
In the sweetest child there’s a vicious streak
In the strongest man there’s a child so weak
In the whole wide world there’s no magic place
So you might as well rise, put on your bravest face
Though we might have precious little
It’s still precious
In the softest voice there’s an acid tongue
In the oldest eyes there’s a soul so young
In the shakiest will there’s a core of steel
On the smoothest ride there’s a squeaky wheel
In the sweetest child there’s a vicious streak
In the strongest man there’s a child so weak
In the whole wide world there’s no magical place
So you might as well rise, put on your bravest face
Oh, you might as well rise, put on your bravest face
Put on your bravest face

The Wilsons

I hadn’t been working at the Nunn Center too long when Jack and Angene Wilson started their latest oral history project. It was to be called African Immigrants in the Bluegrass, and it helped cut my teeth on oral history project building. There are over 20,000 African immigrants in Kentucky. I understand that Lexington hosts one of the largest populations of Congolese immigrants in the nation. As a Kentuckian I’m pleased so many find our state welcoming, at least I hope they do. Jack and Angene certainly do all they can to make everyone welcome, not just newly landed Africans. I got to know the Wilsons over the four years they gathered stories, and yesterday we had the opportunity to be with them for their book launch based on those oral histories. It was an honor to celebrate their hard work and take in just how beloved they are by so many, here and abroad. Jack and Angene were Peace Corps volunteers in Liberia in the early 1960’s. They’d written a book about Peace Corps volunteers taken from oral histories they conducted, so this latest endeavor is far from abnormal for these two passionate, well-educated folks. Their co-authors Francis Musoni and Iddah Otiene stood proudly with the Wilson’s for photos all afternoon. It was heartwarming. I’m proud to know The Wilsons. They’re excellent Kentucky ambassadors.

authors

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