march 13, 2016

posted in: photography | 0

“Everything will be alright in the end. If it’s not alright, it’s not the end.” ~ Irish Proverb

 

dancing color
dancing color

 

You might recall yesterday’s post wherein I said our time at ArtsPlace ended with the beautiful Latina dancers. Naturally, Crystal and I grabbed our cameras and headed toward them (you can see her in the bottom shot). I love that Lexington has such an international population. You wouldn’t necessarily know that unless you live here. The Universities have naturally brought a varied population, perhaps none larger than students from India. As a result, we have great Indian food. When Toyota built their Camry plant in Lexington satellite city Georgetown, a great number of Japanese made The Bluegrass their home. The result, again, is that we have great Asian dining. The horse and farming industries employ quite a few people of Latino descent. As a result, you guessed it: we have great Mexican restaurants. The Latino community is as civic-ly active as their costumes are colorful. Not only do they frequently participate in events like LexArts Art Weekend, but for the past fifteen years they’ve hosted the Festival Latino de Lexington in September. Over two-days it brings an estimated 30,000 people downtown to celebrate Latin heritage. In fact, their slogan is “Many Cultures, One City.” I find that welcoming. It says we’re all in this together: Latinos, Irish, African-American, Japanese, Native American, Chinese, British, Indian, Italian, you name it. We’re all here in Lexington. Yee-haw, girls! Keep kickin’ up your hillbilly heels.

march 12, 2016

posted in: art, photography | 0

“All complaints about life today will be ignored
unless they are submitted in the format of elegant haiku poetry.”
~ Dr. SunWolf

 

the awesome LL
the awesome LL

 

Lori-Lyn Hurley is one of the most eloquent speakers I know. From lunch conversation to contemplative dialogue, she is thoughtful and succinct in everything she says. We’ll add that to her laundry list of talents. I had the honor of being in a discussion with her today at ArtsPlace about art as prayer. It was part of LexArts’ Arts Weekend. At the time we signed up we didn’t realize the city’s plan to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day (the parade started the same time we did), or that Comic Con was in the convention center, or that Disney On Ice was at Rupp Arena. And there was a lot going on inside ArtsPlace, too. The Chamber Choir was in just before us. We could hear children singing on another floor. Some of the most elegant Latina dancers stomping to Mariachi music helped end our day. It was a fun, festive atmosphere in downtown Lexington. There was one unusual thing that happened though. There was a man, another artist from the looks of it, going about his business as if we weren’t there. Through our entire conversation he continued to set up his artwork and lights and projectors and God knows what else. I’m still scratching my head over it. (I should write that as a haiku I suppose) While I was completely distracted by the man-with-no-name Lori-Lyn remained poised, as if we were the only people in existence. Yet another talent I wish I had. I’d start talking, see the man-with-no-name drag in something else, and suddenly fifteen minutes had passed. Lori-Lyn was awfully sweet to let me yammer on. But she did speak, and that’s what I wanted out of this deal. I wanted people to hear her talk about her work and be inspired like I had been inspired when she gave a similar talk in Ewing back in the fall. I have never been with her that I didn’t learn something or become inspired or feel as if I was in the presence of someone with more passion in her pinky than a whole town of people put together. I hope our small audience was able to overlook the interloper because, if they were, then hearing Lori-Lyn speak was worth every roadblock they surely went through to get there. It was a fantastic day made all the more memorable by the man-with-no-name and the wonderful friends, old and new, who came out to support art.

 

the colors that matter
the colors that matter

february 6, 2015

posted in: photography | 0

“The joy of life comes from our encounters with new experiences, and hence there is no greater joy than to have an endlessly changing horizon, for each day to have a new and different sun.”
~ Christopher McCandless

 

first at night
first at night

 

I was very close to First Presbyterian on Mill Street after leaving St. Paul’s Wednesday night, so I thought I’d swing by and see what I could shoot at night (off the car hood no less). I’d noticed how beautiful the church is at night when, last month, I’d gone to Gallery Hop next door at ArtsPlace. I didn’t really have time to photograph it then, so I’ve been waiting for a chance to go back. The cloud cover made for a wonderful effect. I think I’ll dig out my tripod, wait for a warmer night, and go back to it. I may shoot some other churches at night as well. I like the look.

 

in context
in context

march 29, 2012

posted in: photography | 0

I urge you to please notice when you are happy, and exclaim or murmur or think at some point ‘If this isn’t nice, I don’t know what is’.” ~ Kurt Vonnegut

happy

Sandy Davis, Pie Girl extraordinaire, participated in the National Arts Program at ArtsPlace. Her Kentucky Barn pastel drawing was beautiful, like her. If this ain’t happy, I don’t know what is.