december 6, 2017

posted in: music, photography | 0

“We must welcome the future, remembering that soon it will be the past; and we must respect the past, remembering that it was once all that was humanly possible.” ~ George Santayana

 

maestro I

 

When Marlon Hurst isn’t playing trumpet with Four Leonards (and a fifth), he’s conducting the Kentucky Bach Choir. I had the chance to photograph them during last year’s Christmas outing, but I shot mostly from the balcony. This year, though, I was able to work a bit more up close. I was able to get a good look at Marlon whose back is to the audience for the entire concert. I loved it! I could tell he was having a really good time. There’s just not much better in life than people who love what they do. 

 

maestro II

december 7, 2015

posted in: photography | 0

“Some days there won’t be a song in your heart. Sing anyway.” ~ Emory Austin

 

creating a sacred space
creating a sacred space

 

On CBS Sunday Morning there was a segment called Violins of Hope. These were no ordinary violins. They were played in concentration camps by Jewish prisoners, and they are being restored to be played again. The most striking moment from the piece for me was when the luthier said, “It was forbidden to the Jewish to pray (in the camps). The violin was praying for them.” To which the reporter replied, “So, it’s sacred.” Of course, music of all kinds is sacred to many people around the world, even those who don’t play an instrument. But if you do play, it is transcendent, no matter the instrument. Regardless of whether you play or not, music can carry all of us away from sadness, depression, pain, agony, and for the European Jews of the holocaust, it was their brief respite from unmentionable horrors. Can you image playing a violin in front a pile of corpses to find just a moment’s peace? I may never look at a violin the same way after seeing Violins of Hope. It is sacred, and it can create a sacred space for all those who hear the angels sing through it.

december 6, 2015

posted in: photography | 0

“Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.”
~ Mahatma Gandhi

 

IMG_9192_day336_1_15_sm
chiaroscuro

 

For years I’ve been captivated by the cross at First Presbyterian Church. It stirs something in me. Its shadow against the ornate pipes of the organ is intriguing. The cross is especially noticeable at night when the lights are low and moody. Tonight I had the privilege of shooting the Bach Choir Christmas program, and it gave me the chance – thanks to Crystal Heis loaning me her long lens – to shoot the cross in the right conditions.

 

chiaroscuro
tight quarters

 

By the time we were ready for the group portrait, the altar steps were a mass of mic stands and enormous flower arrangements. The choir were willing to change locations, but I’m hoping we can manage another shoot without the accoutrements of performance for a better, more colorful grouping. They’re all such beautiful people that I want to see them in their glory. Plus, the church is just beautiful this time of year.

 

in full
in full

 

The choir was, of course, stellar. The music inspired. There were few empty seats, and I could hear people whispering words of praise for a job well done. I truly enjoyed the performance, and I was especially honored to snap a few shots through the night. I feel so fortunate to know these talented, beautiful people.